A Song for Whoever: Smashing Pumpkins and Bryan Danielson edition

SIDEKICK ANDREW: Just a quick one this week, although the video is longer than usual. I was tempted to write about Superstars and how amazing this week’s episode was. There was a great match between Beth Phoenix and Gail Kim, a surprisingly good match between Alicia Fox and Kaitlyn, and an amazing six-man tag involving the Usos and Trent Baretta against Tyson Kidd, Heath Slater & Justin Gabriel. Wondering what was so great about that match? Well, when was the last time you saw a move like this on Raw?

also, never headbutt a Samoan

Anyway, I was going to write about Superstars, but I’ve already pleaded with you guys to watch the show. Something else you should definitely watch if you get chance (neat segue!) is the Wrestling Road Diaries documentary put out by Colt “Scotty Goldman” Cabana, Bryan “Daniel Bryan” Danielson and Sal “the other one” Rinauro. We had a screening in the Bunker this weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it. If you’ve got a spare couple of quid knocking about, support indie wrestlers and buy it at WrestlingRoadDiaries.com, you won’t regret it.

And in a slightly less smooth segue than before, the behind the scenes footage in that documentary leads to my Song For Whoever this week (bear with me, we’ll get there.) When I was nineteen I lived, for a while, in the back of a van parked for the most part in the car park of Morrison’s supermarket in Blackpool with a friend called Wayne Squire. His name isn’t relevant to the story, but just in case he ever does one of those self-indulgent Google searches we all do from time to time… hi Wayne!

no Google, I did not mean "southern"

When we lived in the van we had a number of cassettes that were played pretty incessantly. Black Sunday by Cypress Hill, Automatic for the People by REM, In Utero by Nirvana… and the first two Smashing Pumpkins albums – Gish and Siamese Dream. These were the soundtrack to my life at a pretty weird time, and as such I’ve still a soft spot for all these bands. So I was pretty excited to hear that the Smashing Pumpkins were recording their new video at an indie wrestling show and involving Raven, Cheerleader Melissa and Shelly Martinez in the shoot.

Billy Corgan from the Smashing Pumpkins is a massive (if somewhat unlikely) wrestling fan, having shown up in the original ECW as well as allowing his songs to be used for at least two TNA PPV hype videos.


How to explain the logic behind releasing a video this week for a single that was released back in 2009? Well, here’s an paragraph I’m stealing from Consequence of Sound to explain it for me.

Let’s start with the facts: Billy Corgan’s Smashing Pumpkins have a new video for their past single, “Owata”, off the still evolving 44-track effort, Teargarden By Kaleidyscope. (The same album which will contain the previously released two EPs and the forthcoming album-within-an-album, Oceania, which is currently being endorsed by one Kareem Abdul-Jabar.) Instead of issuing a quick three to four minute video, which is apparently in the pipeline too, Corgan’s attached his song to director Robby Starbuck’s 12 minute short film about female underground wrestling.

All clear? Cool…

Obligatory Simpsons Reference

So, I started off saying this would be a short one, and it hasn’t been really. Sorry about that. I suppose I could scroll back up and delete that line, but meh… Enjoy the video.

BOSS LADY RAY: I’m afraid I don’t like Smashing Pumpkins or that song or the video (sorry, Andrew) so I’m going to take you down a slightly jazzier road this week. As Andrew mentioned, this past weekend we watched Colt Cabana, Bryan Danielson and Sal Rinauro take a ten-day road trip to shows and training workshops in the Wrestling Road Diaries documentary. It’s rather brilliant and worth any spare pennies you’ve got floating around.

The ten days it covers are Bryan Danielson’s last week and a half before he heads off to the WWE to morph into Daniel Bryan on NXT. There are two things that come across strongly throughout – the wonderful friendship between the three of them, and the fact that they love their jobs. I mean they really love their jobs. They travel all over the world for very little money, in a car with a cracked windscreen, sleeping on friends’ couches and buying clothes in charity shops. Admittedly that last one was just for fun. But still, it becomes apparent that to be on the indie wrestling circuit you have to truly love it and they clearly do. They regularly mention that they think they have the best job in the world. How many people can honestly say they feel that way about their job? Even when some health issues put Bryan Danielson’s WWE contract in jeopardy, he’s reasonably calm about it, because he can still do what he loves to do elsewhere.

I watched Bryan wrestle Ted DiBiase on Smackdown this morning, and it occurred to me that he’s one of the few who gets to just go out and completely be himself on TV. (Albeit with a slight name change.) Despite the fact that his style of wrestling isn’t Flavour of the Month in the mainstream at the moment, he’s still the same guy he is in the documentary, at least for as long as that character allows him to be. This one’s dedicated to you, Bryan Da>ielson, for reminding me that if you don’t love your job, you need a new one.

PS—> Previous mild crush on Colt Cabana is now a giant one. What can I say? I’m a sucker for a boy who makes me laugh!

In which we (briefly) discuss the generous nature of CHIKARA

As you’ve no doubt noticed, it’s Wrestlemania Week! The Grandest Stage of Them All! The Showcase of The Immortals! The Grandaddy of Them All! We’re as excited as the next couple of wrestling fans, hoarding our goodies for late-night snacking and buying out annual “Wrestlemania pyjamas.” But amongst the glitz and glamour of Art Exhibitions, Press Conferences, Pro-Celebrity Golf Tournaments and lavish Hall of Fame Ceremonies, it’s easy to forget about the little guys…

We feel your pain bro

However, amazing as Zack Ryder and his Beyond The Mat references are, that’s not what today’s post is about. Nope, today I want to show you some great wrestling matches from Wrestlegasm favourites CHIKARA. Ordinarily this would be, at the very least, legally questionable; but being the incredibly generous souls that they are, CHIKARA have amended their weekly podcast format to include a full match each week, for FREE! However, I accept that a lot of you won’t be subscribed to their YouTube channel so you might not realise just what you’re missing out on. Therefore, in our ongoing quest to introduce more and more people to CHIKARA, I’m going to post a few selections here and let you make up your own minds.

If you like any of these matches (and I sincerely hope you do) then I hope you’ll consider buying a couple of DVDs next time you have some spare cash. I promise you won’t regret it. You can either get them directly through CHIKARA or via Smart Mark Video (Smart Mark have regular sales where you can usually save the cost of postage to the UK which is always a bonus)

To start with, my favourite CHIKARA match ever, and possibly one of my favourite wrestling matches ever. I’ve shilled this match like crazy over the last couple of years, but this is the first time the full match has been available for free. Kota Ibushi vs El Generico vs Jigsaw vs Nick Jackson from the King of Trios tournament 2009 (available here) Do me a favour though, for the last few minutes, remember to breathe.

Next up, a singles match between two former Young Lions Cup champions, Chuck Taylor vs Fire Ant from Vanity & Violence in 2008 (available here) CHIKARA specialise in multi-person matches, but they throw out some fun singles matches, and a big fan of Chuck Taylor (and Ray loves the Ants) so I can recommend this one.

Back to Trios action, with The BDK vs Perros del Mal from King of Trios 2010 (available here) The BDK are the main heel faction in CHIKARA at the moment (think The Nexus or NWO for reference points) and Perros del Mal are a team of luchadors from Mexico. Quite frankly, if you don’t find the idea of a 6’7″ Norse God of War squaring up against a 3’7″ butterfly thing then CHIKARA might not be for you…

Actually, the same could be said about two Mexican anthropomorphic ice creams wrestling a team of time-displaced sportsmen (an olde-time baseball player and a funky Seventies basketball star) but that’s what the next match entails: Los Ice Creams vs The Throwbacks from Cibernetico Increible (available here)

Last, but I promise you, definitely not least, CHIKARA is one of the few (non-female only) promotions to treat women wrestlers well. In fact, it was an inter-gender match from CHIKARA that inspired this great post by Boss Lady Ray. Anyway, from the Double Header with the Dragon Gate promotion, Amazing Kong and Raisha Saeed vs Sara Del Rey and Daizee Haze from Chikarasaurus Rex: King of Show (available here)

wrestlegasm’s top 10 female wrestlers – part 1

Contrary to what you may have been led to believe, based on my unabashed man-crush on William Regal, I am not only heterosexual but also married. Being married to a woman who doesn’t watch wrestling whilst being a fan of women’s wrestling can lead to a few raised eyebrows at the least, not to mention a number of disparaging comments. While this can be excused (and even expected) during something such as the lingerie matches or gravy bowl matches of old, or during a Kelly Kelly match; sometimes even a depraved character such as myself enjoys watching a women’s wrestling match for the actual wrestling.

As March is Women’s History Month (a fact that, perhaps ironically, was brought to my attention by wwe.com) Ray has been kind enough to allow me to do a brief write-up on my Top 10 favourite women wrestlers. These are all women that I feel have a huge amount of wrestling ability, and get by based on that rather than how good they might look in a bikini. Having said that, I don’t mean to imply that any of these women wouldn’t look good in a bikini – I’m still a bloke after all.

A couple of pointers before we start. First of all, this list is only including current wrestlers. The reason for this is that I hope that at least some of you may have your interest piqued enough to look up a few matches by these women. If they are still wrestling it gives you something to look for in the future. Also, this list only contains ten wrestlers, primarily for two reasons.

1.    It’s a traditional number for lists, and I am nothing if not a traditionalist
2.    I’m quite lazy, so couldn’t be bothered doing write-ups for more than ten

Unfortunately, confining the list to only ten current wrestlers does mean that a lot of great women have to be missed out; women like the hugely influential Trish Stratus, Lita (who was partly responsible for my resurgent interest in wrestling back in my twenties, the criminally misused and underrated Molly Holly, the always enjoyable Vimto-loving national treasure that is Jetta, and my guilty pleasure Mickie Knuckles to name a few. That’s without even going back and looking at managers such as Sunny or Sherri Martel, or older stars such as The Fabulous Moolah or Mildred Burke. That being said, the ten wrestlers listed should be enough to get you interested, and if you do enjoy any of the videos linked then I’ve done my job.

Also, the more well known the wrestler, the less I’ll be writing about them. Let’s be honest; you’ll all be pretty familiar with, for example, Mickie James’ work in WWE – but you might not be as familiar with Cheerleader Melissa’s pre-TNA career. So I’ll be concentrating on the wrestlers and aspects of their careers that you will hopefully be able to learn a couple of bits from.

Historically wrestling promotions haven’t treated women with the greatest of respect, although a lot of indie promotions still pay women more than men as they apparently “perform the double duty of wrestling and being eye candy.” The WWE (and, as much as I hate to admit it, TNA) have both upped their game lately in this regard, but companies such as CHIKARA and Ring of Honor have generally treated female wrestlers just as well as their male counterparts for longer. Unsurprisingly though, it’s still the all-female promotions that are the best places to watch women’s wrestling. Chicago-based Shimmer is probably the most successful and best known but there is also an all-women promotion currently starting up in the UK called Pro-Wrestling Eve which looks promising (and not just because they listed me as a Follow Friday on Twitter once) so they could hopefully be one to watch. The other “current” all-female promotion is Wrestlicious; which, despite featuring a number of very talented female wrestlers (including two from my list and one current WWE star) I find very hard to recommend.

Of all the wrestlers on my list, LuFisto will probably be the most controversial. After all, this is a woman who regularly competes against men in deathmatches (a “privilege” she had to fight for.) For those of you not in the know, deathmatch wrestling is a predominantly male orientated niche, involving a multitude of weapons such as barbed wire, fluorescent light tubes and the like.

Born Genny Goulet in Quebec, Lufisto debuted in 1997 and, after working the usual role of valet, became the first woman to win a male championship title in Quebec, winning the ICW Provincial Championship (just one in a string of firsts) In 2002 she was booked to compete for the Canadian Blood, Sweat & Ears promotion in the main event against a male wrestler called Bloody Bill Skullion. Unfortunately the Ontario Athletics Commission would not allow the match to go ahead, due to a rule banning women from wrestling men in Ontario. This would essentially ban LuFisto from wrestling in Ontario, as there was a dearth of female wrestlers who were working the same style as her. After lodging a complaint with the Ontario Human Rights Commission, LuFisto managed to get the regulation dropped, allowing her to forge a successful career in Ontario, before moving back to Quebec to wrestle for the NWA and set up “Onyx and LuFisto’s Torture Chamber” – a wrestling school at which she is co-head trainer.

LuFisto has gone to find success in the United States as well as Canada, becoming the first ever female Combat Zone Wrestling Iron Man Champion, as well as the first woman to compete in both the CZW Cage of Death match and the CZW Best of the Best tournament. She has also had a series of acclaimed matches for the Shimmer promotion, including twice being named #1 contender for the Shimmer Championship.

In June 2009, alongside Stephane Bruyere, LuFisto set up the NCW Femmes Fatales promotion in Montreal, helping to create an extra market for female wrestlers in Canada.

Warning: the following video does involve some deathmatch clips and blood, so if that’s not something you want to see – don’t watch it.


Former valet of Matt “Evan Bourne” Sydal, and current head trainer for all-female promotion Shimmer, Daizee Haze is the next entry on my list. Trained by ex-WWE & ECW star Kid Kash and current Chikara and ROH star Delirious, Daizee Haze’s gimmick is that of a “hippy-stoner” – a tribute to her hippy dad who died when she was 15.

After debuting in 2002 for the Missouri-based Gateway Championship Wrestling promotion, Haze became Matt Sydal’s manager in both IWA Mid-South and Ring of Honor in 2004. Despite women’s wrestling not being common in ROH at the time, Haze entered into a feud with Allison Danger (random fact: Allison Danger is the sister of ex-ECW star Steve Corino and the wife of current Chikara star Ares, as well as being the co-founder of Shimmer.)

Haze went on to have great success in both ROH and it’s sister promotion Shimmer, although she has never held the Shimmer Championship. Haze also appeared in TNA on a few occasions in 2003 alongside Matt Sydal, at one point losing a mixed tag match against Julio Dinero and Alexis Laree (the future Mickie James.) Haze also took part in the Wrestlicious tapings as Marley Sebastian, although as that episode hasn’t been broadcast yet who knows how embarrassing it may be…


The first really well known wrestler on my list, Mickie James will be well known to you all from her huge successes in WWE. However, she had already had a reasonably successful career on the indie wrestling circuit as Alexis Laree. An ex-dancer, James debuted as a valet for KYDA Pro Wrestling at the age of 20, going on to manage Tommy Dreamer to win the KYDA Pro Heavyweight Championship.

After making the move from valet/manager to wrestler, James continued to train, attending camps at Dory Funk Jr’s Funking Conservatory and the original ECW dojo run by Taz. Like many of the women on this list, James worked for ROH for a while, before joining TNA and becoming a member of Raven’s “Gathering,” a stable also featuring Julio Dinero and CM Punk. Whilst there she became the first, and to date only, woman to take part in a Clockwork Orange House of Fun match (and yes, I am well aware how stupid a name that is for a match.)

James eventually (after an apparent 2 years of phone calls and tapes being submitted) signed a WWE developmental contract in 2004, being placed in the then developmental territory Ohio Valley Wrestling. After a year of mainly tag matches (and a much-coveted Halloween Costume Competition victory) James was entered into a tournament for the OVW Television Title, defeating Mike Mondo (later Mikey of the WWE’s Spirit Squad stable) in the first round, before being beaten by Bobby Lashley (then wrestling as Blaster Lashley) in the second.

After feuds with both Beth Phoenix and Shelly Martinez (ECW’s Ariel), James left OVW and started a very successful stint as Trish Stratus’ obsessive fan, a role which soon moved onto the lesbian stalker angle we all know and love. This angle culminated in a very enjoyable Wone’s Championship match at Wrestlemania 22 in which Mickie won the title.

Following this, James had a numbe rof sucessful feuds against the likes of Lita, Melina and Beth Phoenix, before recently being thrown into the now infamous (at least in Wrestlegasm circles) “Piggie James” angle against Michelle McCool and Layla. Ray has covered this particular angle in much more detail than I will, suffice to say that when James recovers from the staph infection that’s keeping her out at the moment, we’ll be hoping for a slightly happier ending to that feud.


While arguably better known to a wider audience for her recent stint in TNA as both Raisha Saeed and Alissa Flash, Melissa Anderson (a second generation wrestler) has had a successful career for promotions like Chickfight and Shimmer. After training under Christopher Daniels and Bryan Danielson, Melissa’s cheerleader gimmick came about after she was a valet for an Ice Hockey themed tag team known as the Ballard Brothers (and yes Ray, I’m aware that there are no cheerleaders in Ice Hockey)

After having her debut match on her 17th birthday, Melissa was chosen to train in Japan alongside Taylor Methany from WWE’s Tough Enough program. This led to a certain amount of internet exposure for her, thus ending her valet career and transforming her into a full time wrestler. Melissa went on to perform at the first 10 Chickfight tournaments, defeating ex-WWE star Jazz to win Chickfight 5, and British wrestler Eden Black to win Chickfight 7. Melissa also had a couple of suns with Canadian promotion Extreme Canadian Championship Wrestling, feuding against Natalya Neidhart (then Nattie Neidhart) as well as having a try-out match on WWE Heat against Victoria in 2006.

Melissa has also appeared for Shimmer at all of their events to date, even competing in their first ever Hardcore Rules and Last Woman Standing matches against MsChif. This feud spread across Shimmer and the UK-based Real Quality Wrestling, although the Melissa and MsChif eventually formed a tag team, taking on the likes of sara Del Rey and Awesome Kong.  It was in 2008 however, that Melissa gained her first international TV exposure, accompanying Awesome Kong in TNA as Raisha Saeed. Although her first few appearances were in managerial role, at 2008’s Lockdown Saeed and Kong had a steel cage tag match against Gail Kim and ODB. This led to a number of tag matches, eventually culminating in the tournament to determine the first TNA Knockouts Tag Champions. During this tournament the team fell apart, leading to a match against each other with Kong won; essentially ending the team for good.

Melissa returned to TNA in May 2009, having a “try-out” match as Cheerleader Melissa defeating Daizee Haze. A number of sporadic losing appearances, now under the name of Alissa Flash, eventually led to a win over Cody Deaner due to the interference of a number of other Knockouts. Alissa Flash didn’t score her first unassisted victory until November, although as TNA neglected to use her again after that match, she requested and was granted her release in January 2010.

Now known as Tara in TNA, I’ll stick with Victoria through personal preference. Originally a body-builder and fitness model, Victoria (born Lisa Marie Varon) met Chyna who encouraged her to get in touch with WWE to train as a wrestler. After training with then developmental territories Memphis Championship Wrestling and Ohio Valley Wrestling, she debuted on Raw as one of the Godfather’s “Hos”    before entering a feud as Trish Stratus, somebody she had met earlier while working as a fitness model. This earlier meeting was to be used in the WWE to build the storyline, with Victoria being a demented character out for revenge after Trish had apparently betrayed her during this previous career.

Victoria went on to defeat Stratus for the Women’s Championship at Survivor Series 2002 in a hardcore match, although the feud continues through to Wrestlemania XIX when she dropped the title back to Trish in a triple threat match.  Later that year Victoria took part in the first ever Women’s Steel Cage Match in WWE where she defeated Lita. After this, and entering into a feud with then Women’s Champion Molly Holly, Victoria turned face. After regaining the championship by beating Molly, their rematch at Wrestlemania XX was a Hair vs Title match which Victoria won, leading to Molly Holly being shaved bald.

Victoria soon turned heel again though, leading Vince’s Devils (Victoria, Candice Michelle and Torrie Wilson) against the likes of Ashley Massaro and Trish Stratus. Victoria’s character was boosted soon after by her more vicious nature coming through, legitimately breaking the noses of Candice Michelle and Michelle McCool, as well as the jaw of Beth Phoenix (in her debut WWE match). After retiring from the WWE in January 2009, Victoria has continued training in Mixed martial Arts and has returned to pro-wrestling as part of TNA, winning the Knockouts Title 3 times to date.

So that’s it for this part. A couple of very well known wrestlers, and 3 who might not so familiar to you. Hopefully you’ve learnt a little and enjoyed the videos. I’ll be getting the second part (Ranks 1-5) together very soon, but if you have any questions about women’s wrestling I’ll be happy to access the secret geek part of my brain and see if I can help.